Internet-accessed sexually transmitted infection (e-STI) testing and results service: A randomised, single-blind, controlled trial

Wilson, E, Free, C, Morris, TP, Syred, J, Ahamed, I, Menon-Johansson, AS, Palmer, MJ, Barnard, S, Rezel, E and Baraitser, P. 2017. Internet-accessed sexually transmitted infection (e-STI) testing and results service: A randomised, single-blind, controlled trial. [Online]. PLOS Medicine. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002479

Wilson, E, Free, C, Morris, TP, Syred, J, Ahamed, I, Menon-Johansson, AS, Palmer, MJ, Barnard, S, Rezel, E and Baraitser, P. Internet-accessed sexually transmitted infection (e-STI) testing and results service: A randomised, single-blind, controlled trial. [Internet] LSHTM Data Compass. PLOS Medicine; 2017. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002479

Wilson, E, Free, C, Morris, TP, Syred, J, Ahamed, I, Menon-Johansson, AS, Palmer, MJ, Barnard, S, Rezel, E and Baraitser, P (2017). Internet-accessed sexually transmitted infection (e-STI) testing and results service: A randomised, single-blind, controlled trial. [Data Collection]. PLOS Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002479

Description

Description of data capture The study took place in the London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark. Between 24 November 2014 and 31 August 2015, we recruited 2,072 participants, aged 16–30 years, who were resident in these boroughs, had at least 1 sexual partner in the last 12 months, stated willingness to take an STI test, and had access to the internet. Those unable to provide consent and unable to read English were excluded. Participants were randomly allocated to receive 1 text message with the web link of an e-STI testing and results service (intervention group) or to receive 1 text message with the web link of a bespoke website listing the locations, contact details, and websites of 7 local sexual health clinics (control group). Participants were free to use any other services or interventions during the study period. The primary outcomes were self-reported STI testing at 6 weeks, verified by patient record checks, and self-reported STI diagnosis at 6 weeks, verified by patient record checks. Secondary outcomes were the proportion of participants prescribed treatment for an STI, time from randomisation to completion of an STI test, and time from randomisation to treatment of an STI. Participants were sent a £10 cash incentive on submission of self-reported data. We completed all follow-up, including patient record checks, by 17 June 2016. Uptake of STI testing was increased in the intervention group at 6 weeks (50.0% versus 26.6%, relative risk [RR] 1.87, 95% CI 1.63 to 2.15, P < 0.001). The proportion of participants diagnosed was 2.8% in the intervention group versus 1.4% in the control group (RR 2.10, 95% CI 0.94 to 4.70, P = 0.079). No evidence of heterogeneity was observed for any of the pre-specified subgroup analyses. The proportion of participants treated was 1.1% in the intervention group versus 0.7% in the control group (RR 1.72, 95% CI 0.71 to 4.16, P = 0.231). Time to test, was shorter in the intervention group compared to the control group (28.8 days versus 36.5 days, P < 0.001, test for difference in restricted mean survival time [RMST]), but no differences were observed for time to treatment (83.2 days versus 83.5 days, P = 0.51, test for difference in RMST). We were unable to recruit the planned 3,000 participants and therefore lacked power for the analyses of STI diagnoses and STI cases treated.
Data capture method Questionnaire: Fixed form - Web-based, Experiment
Date (Published in a 3rd party system) 27 December 2017
Geographical area covered
North LatitudeEast LongitudeSouth LatitudeWest Longitude
51.4892-0.077305251.484-0.0886348
51.4605-0.12136251.4575-0.12634
Language(s) of written materials English
Data Creators Wilson, E, Free, C, Morris, TP, Syred, J, Ahamed, I, Menon-Johansson, AS, Palmer, MJ, Barnard, S, Rezel, E and Baraitser, P
LSHTM Faculty/Department Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Participating Institutions London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
Funders
ProjectFunderGrant NumberFunder URI
Can internet-based sexual health services increase diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections (STIs)? Evaluation of an internet-based sexual health serviceGuy's and St Thomas' CharityUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Depositor LSHTM Library & Archives Service
Date Deposited 03 Jan 2018 10:34
Last Modified 03 Jan 2018 10:34
Publisher PLOS Medicine

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